Waveforms and Other Modes of Being

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2009, welded aluminum, soil and flowering plants

To find a harmonic balance between human-construction and the organic growth of nature. The concept of the bridge came about as a way to symbolically unite two disparate entities. The “Bridge Across Generations” was a commissioned project for a community garden in Astoria, in the New York City Borough of Queens. This section of Astoria is an isolated part of the city. The Robert Kennedy Bridge (formerly the Triborough Bridge) looms over-head while Manhattan sits across the river. Subway trains are a distance away leaving this mixed income housing area with a lack of amenities and access. The flowering bridge was a symbol of connecting. It was supported with a grant from the Queens Council on the Arts and additional funds awarded by the Citizens Committee for New York City and was installed through the gardening season of 2009.

2005, automotive paint on pressed aluminum with polished stainless steel supports, image courtesy of Self Absorbed Boomer blog

2007, translucent powder coating on pressed aluminum with polished stainless steel, image courtesy of This Week in New York blog

2003, temporarily altered landscape

2006, pressed and welded aluminum with translucent paint

2009, welded aluminum, soil and flowering plants

2011, abandoned bicycle parts, with stainless steel, soil and tulip image courtesy of Gwyneth's Full Brew blog

How is my work about shelter? Some of it could provide shade, some of it you could hide under. It is about surface. It is influenced from structures, cars, and things we use for convenience. It is about some other place. Shelter. Shelter from what? From global warming? From the winter cold? From fear? From terrorism?

But why must art answer to these world dilemmas?

It’s not nothing: no shelter, no solution to life’s problems. No true offer of concealment. No benefit of any measurable kind. Why on Earth make these weird things? If they are not to the benefit of humankind then why bother? The senselessness of odd objects. A madness of observable proportions. Cubits to feet to centimeters. And words are useless Period

3 Responses to Waveforms and Other Modes of Being

  1. mac says:

    Art sings to the soul of humanity. Take it or leave. That’s what it accomplishes. Enjoy, Mac

  2. Julia Chiesa says:

    Wonderful! I think you’ve hit something, not only in s few of the worls, but in the ideas behind them…the ideas about the use of creating for the people in a neighborhood, how one may bring a community together, what art may play in the minds and expereinces of the people around us, this is an awesome space to be creating work. Sometimes in the art world it seems that the makers can be after something else, but through the intention that was placed there from the get go we can really make a difference. I love the mangled bicycle and altered ground of grass(which reminded me straight away of Maya Lin’s wave studies). Your, University Settlement Waveform… I wasnt sure if it was a satirical joke about academia, but I liked that underpinned cackle that the grass gave me when thinking how to understand the use of those three words as a title… University. Settlement. Waveform. Like some strange code for understanding them has uplifted and formed the ground in such a softened manner, without scale, without the sign of weight or gravity, as if paused amidts a science fiction film set left after to the one who owned the farm they shot it on. And the pole being embraced by the bicycle made me want to see more subtle pieces such as this around the cities of the world. It would be a great piece in San Fransisco, lingering between a political relationship with cars that many SFites have cursed about while they cough on their sparkling GT pacific blues at the light behind the black Land Rover. Are we all Clinging safely on or mangled from a crash into with full force? Whichever it may be is up to the viewer, but those two especially made my smile largely and think about a thing or two. Great work!